Joe Soraghan: Rules We Might Like to See

"Putts get real difficult the day they hand out the money." — Lee Trevino, pro golfer

The year 2019 will be a landmark time for golfers. The United States Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Club of St. Andrews are changing a number of long-standing rules. Golfers everywhere have been playing by these dicta for years and will need to learn the new standards. As stated in the Rules, "Play the ball as it lies, play the course as you find it, and if you cannot do either, do what is fair. But to do what is fair, you need to know the Rules of Golf."

Imagine if the Rules were relaxed a bit and you had the option of incorporating your own, user-friendly rules. Your time on the course might bring more smiles and less angst. Here are a few suggested "wish-list" rules:

Rule 1. A ball sliced or hooked into the rough shall be placed in the fairway at a point equal to the distance the ball carried or rolled into the rough with no penalty. Why should we be penalized for grass the grounds crew didn't mow?

Rule 2. A ball that hits a tree shall be deemed not to have hit the tree. This is simply bad luck, and luck has no place in a scientific game such as golf. The player will estimate the distance the ball should have traveled and play his next shot from the estimated distance.

Rule 3. There shall be no such thing as a lost ball. The wayward sphere is on or near the course and will eventually be found by another. This would make the ball a stolen ball and you would be assessed a penalty for playing with stolen property.

Rule 4. If a putt passes over a hole without dropping, it is deemed to have dropped. The Laws of Gravity supersede The Rules of Golf.

Rule 5. There is no penalty for an out-of-bounds shot. If the golf-course owners had bought sufficient land to expand the course, there would be no need to have an "out of bounds."

Rule 6. There is no penalty for a ball in a water hazard. Golf balls should float. This is a manufacturing shortcoming.

Obviously, these tongue-in-cheek interpretations of the Rules don't exist. I wish I could take credit for this "tweaking," but I found this while reading some golf articles and I cannot find the author.

But reading these and other interpretations only reminded me that the true reason we are challenging ourselves in this great game is to have fun and enjoy the time spent on the course. Too often you see players who beat themselves up during their rounds. You've seen it — golf clubs attempting to defy gravity. You've heard it — language that does not coincide with the intelligence level the golfer feels he or she possesses. Mother Earth gets punished for bad golf. Players need to relax a bit. None of us will be teeing it up in a major.

Golfers can be competitive, skilled and tough while enjoying a round of golf. This can be in a tournament or your weekly match with friends. If the "Golf Gods" are working against you, and you are facing a hair-pulling round or situation, learn to put an errant shot behind you. Take the difficult lie your ball has found and give the shot your best effort. Don't play the "blame game." Golf is a difficult game to be played on an uncertain "game board." Take what faces you, hit your shot and move on, readying yourself for what faces you on your next shot.

Club Notes

North Conway Country Club, 50 Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-9391: The 2-Day Member/Guest was held last weekend under a new format. Players had five nine-hole matches where points were awarded for each match played. The women had two divisions and the men had six. For the women, in the Sorenstam Division it was Toni Belding and Patti Nesbit winning. In the Lopez Division, Kathleen Thompson and Donna Tanner won and were the overall winners in a shootout. For the men, in the Palmer Division it was Ed and Pat O'Halloran. The Nicklaus Division saw Sandy Allan and Jay Morgan top their tier. The Hogan Division had Gary Williams and Chuck Seavey top the group. In the Jones Division it was Steve and Paul Blaser. The Snead Division saw Dick Goss and Francis McCarthy take top spot. The Nelson Division had Scott Merrill and Wally Campbell take top honors. The overall winners in the shootout were Allan and Morgan. Week 8 of the Thursday Ledgeview League saw Designated Drivers finish first. They were followed by The Putt Pirates and Buddy's Boys. Closest to the pin was Bruce Sanderson. Week 7 of the Monday League saw the Green Bottles & Birdies take top spot. They were followed by the Trophy Husbands and Bent Putters. Closest to the pin were Kevin Hamlin and Kathy Sweeney. The Pro/Member tournament will be Sunday, Aug. 6. Sign up in the pro shop.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: Week 6 of Red Fox League saw a Best-Ball event using three of the Best-Ball scores. Taking first were The Flyers in 7. Second went to the Hale Merry's and third, Stan and Dan's. Closest to the pin was Jeff Butler. Long putt winners were Jon Rivers and Pam Lewis.This Sunday, the Mixed Team Championship will be held. Aug. 1 is the deadline to sign up for The Ladies Invitational, to be played Aug. 9. This year's theme is "Vintage Golf." The Memorial Hospital Tournament was held last week with a full field and beautiful weather for the players. A big thank you to all who played and helped through sponsorship.

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: July is "Family Golf Month" at the Eagle. Discounted rates are being offered every day after 2 p.m., when adults play with juniors. The cost is $15 for the adult and $10 for the junior when they play together. The Thursday Eagle League saw the team of Anne Lee Doig, Dick Ficke, Marie and Jack Lee take the top spot. Closest to the pin was Janice Andrews. On Saturday, July 29, PGA Pro, Bob McGraw, will be offering a full swing clinic covering the fundamentals needed to be successful when hitting the driver and fairway woods. The cost is $20 and the class is limited to six students.

Hale's Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: Week 8 of Men's League saw Doug Beauregard and Jerry Henry post +3 in the weekly quota game. Closest to the pin honors went to Ray Luchetti. In Women's League action, it was Anne Lee Doig who posted a +6 to take top spot. Dottie Heffernan got closest to the pin. Nine, Wine, and Dine continues every Sunday. For $55 per person, you get nine holes of golf with a cart as well as a full dinner and glass of wine. Call the hotel to make your reservation (603-356- 7100) and the pro shop for a tee time. If you are in the market for a new golf bag, all Titleist and Callaway golf bags are 25 percent off in the pro shop.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: The 2017 President's Cup is in the archives. Standing alone at the top was Tim Chandler in this competitive match play event. This weekend, LKCC will host the Club Championship matches. On Aug. 3, at 5:30 p.m., another 9-3-3 Scramble is scheduled. This is a nine-hole scramble where only par 3's are played. The event is open to nine three-person teams where both members and non-members are invited. The cost is $10 for members and $15 for non-members. Sign-ups have begun for the Member/Member schedule for August 6. The cost is $35 and includes dinner at Ebeneezer's. Call the pro shop for more information.

Linderhof Country Club, Across from Storyland, Bartlett, (603) 383-9074: On Saturday, July 29, the LCC will host a nine-hole scramble to benefit the Mount Washington Valley End 68 Hours of Hunger. This a 2 p.m. shotgun start where there will be no prizes: 100 percent of the proceeds will be going to End 68 Hours of Hunger. The golf is $100 per person and a "country picnic" will follow the golf. Entertainment by Miss Maybell and Slimpickin's will be provided 6-8 p.m. The event is open to the public and is sponsored by Black Bear Realty, Memorial Hospital, RE/Max Presidential, Badger Realty, Cooper Cargill and Chant, and Blue Moose Vacation Rentals. RSVP (603) 383-9074.

19th Hole

While playing your weekend round, where you are trying to relax and compete, keep in mind that everyone approaches hitting the golf ball differently. Two of golf's greats, Bobby Jones and Ben Hogan, had opposing views about mind and body when hitting your shot. Jones said, "The keynote of the address position should be ease, comfort and relaxation." Hogan prescribed to "Right off the reel, it will help the golfer realize that pure relaxation is something he can't attain and shouldn't want to."

The next thing you know, someone will ask you if you inhale or exhale during your downswing. Good luck this weekend!

Joe Soraghan may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">.

Joe Soraghan: Three Weeks of Gowff

"Golf is an exercise in Scottish pointlessness for people who are no longer able to throw telephone poles at each other." — Florence King, American novelist, essayist and columnist

For three weeks, "gowff," the Scottish version of "golf," returns to its roots with the Irish, Scottish and Open Championships. The venues are on "links courses." Watching the game being played on these challenging courses, the type where the game developed, gets players excited about playing golf.

Watching the best players in the world hit shots from pot-hole bunkers, knee-deep heather and lunar-like landscapes provides great entertainment and fills us with admiration. Compound the difficult courses with weather that might find many of us sitting it out in the 19th hole, you see golf as it is supposed to be played.

While visiting friends in Ireland last fall, my wife surprised me with a birthday gift. She had booked us on a flight to Edinburgh, Scotland. From there, we were headed to St. Andrews and stayed at a bed-and-breakfast called the Morris Inn. Were we going to play golf? I didn't have any clubs. Not to worry, my tour director had taken care of everything. Arriving at St. Andrews by public transportation, we entered the town and drove past the Old Course. I felt like a child on Christmas. Never did I think I would be visiting the "Home of Golf"!

The town of St. Andrews is a combination of golfers, golf shops, golf pilgrims and students. I often see the first of the golf professionals identified as "club-makers." The shops of these early golf professionals still exist and are thriving. I asked one shop worker, "How many clubs did they need to make, if the game was played by so few?" The response I received was, "Clubs would only last 10-12 rounds before they would need to be replaced." And "Golf balls would crumble after three or four holes." We visited the Old Course Hotel that sits along the 17th hole. They have a restaurant and bar that provides a beautiful view of the course. Next-door is the "Jigger Inn." The bar area is decorated with golf memorabilia. I could have stayed there for hours.

What grabs the attention of patrons are the hats that adorn the ceiling. I asked the bartender, "How do you get your hat to hang from the rafters?" I was thinking my North Conway Country Club hat would look great up there. He replied, "You need to win a major." Every major winner, dating back to Ben Hogan, had their autographed hat in the collection. I still have my hat.

St. Andrews was everything and more than I had wished. If you need to get your golfing spirit recharged, a trip here should be on your bucket list. Maureen and I were able to get in a couple of rounds. One of these, the Castle Course, is a difficult, oceanfront links outside town. We were able to take a cart, and, after renting clubs, I think the starter and one of the assistant pros might have had some reservations about us playing on their course. We got to the first hole and all eyes were on us as we teed it up. If I were a hockey player, I would have received a two-minute penalty for slashing! I snap-hooked my drive about 150 yards into the heather. Maureen got to the tee and ripped one right down the middle. The pro turned to the starter and purposely within our range of hearing said, "She'll be fine, but I don't know about him!"

It turned out to be a great afternoon experiencing golf on a beautiful links course on the Firth of Forth.

Enjoy the upcoming golf championships from such special places during these next few weeks!

Club Notes

North Conway Country Club, 50 Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-9391: The Monday Ledgeview League saw the Golf Team take top honors. Second place was a tie between the Bent Putters and the Dog Gone Good Gals. Closest to the pin were Doug Dugrenier and Gwen Munroe. Thursday night saw the Putt Pirates take top spot, followed by the Designated Drivers and the Ball Busters. Closest to the pin for the men was Chris Hoyt. The ladies CTP is a carryover. The Two Day Member/Guest will be held July 22-23. Sign up in the Pro Shop. The Ladies League played a blind draw event. Taking first was Tici Lutjen and Joanne Phaneuf. The annual Pro/Member tournament will be Aug. 6.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The Ladies League held a "Rally For Jen's Friends Tournament" and invited the Turtles to play in this worthwhile event. Taking first for the ladies was the team of Beth Ellis, Reggie Leblanc and Virginia Fould. On the men's side, it was Dave Lowry, Earl Hopkins, Bill Flynn and Mark McPherson taking the top spot. In Red Fox action, it was the Pin Seekers taking first. They were followed by the Hale Merry's and Flyers in 7. Closest to the pin went to Steve Todd for the men. The ladies will have a carryover for CTP honors. Overall, there is a tie for first between Team Shanks-A-Lot and the Flyers in 7. The Mixed Team Tournament, a.k.a.The Divorce Open, will be played on Sunday, July 30. Congratulations to Wentworth member Stephen Puzas, who qualified for the State Amateur Tournament and as of this writing has advanced to the match-play part of the event. Great job!

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: The Spring Don Ho League has completed its 2017 season with two teams, GB Carrier and the Sea Dogs, tied for first. Both teams posted a -46 and a nine-hole playoff is being scheduled. Thursday Eagle League saw the team of Jim Doig, Michael Smither, JoAnne Corcoran, Nicki Lynn and Dave Matesky take first place. Closest to the pin went to Dennis Soraghan. July is "Family Golf Month" at the Eagle. Discounted rates are being offered every day after 2 p.m. when adults play with juniors. The cost is $15 for the adult and $10 for the junior when they play together. A "Free Family Clinic" is being offered this Sunday at 1 p.m. If clubs are needed, they will be provided. On Saturday, July 16, PGA Pro Bob McGraw will be offering a short swing clinic. The focus will be chipping, pitching and bunker shots. The fee is $20, and the class is limited to 6 students.

Hale's Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: "There's always time for 9." Hale's Pro Shop is offering 25 percent off of all Titleist and Callaway golf bags. They have added Srixon golf balls and Cleveland wedges and putters to their inventory. Week 6 of Men's League saw Dave Pierce post a +5 in the weekly quota game. Closest to the pin winner was Steve Wolner. In Ladies' League, it was June Lundin posting a +4 while Dottie Heffernan got closest to the pin honors. Nine,Wine, and Dine continues every Sunday. For $55 per person, you get nine holes of golf with a cart as well as a full dinner and glass of wine. Call the hotel to make your reservation (603-356-7100) and the Pro Shop for a tee time.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: After week six of the Men's Twilight League, Team Lord finds themselves in the lead with 445 points They are followed by Team Littlefield, 428 points, Team Alimi, 421 points, Team Trumbull, 413 points, Team Osgood, 354, 354 points and Team Shorey, 312 points. The Junior Golf program started on July 11. Aspiring players can still join and are welcome to attend any Tuesday or Wednesday for the Junior Golf Clinic. The deadline to register for the Club Championship is July 16. Lake Kezar is participating in the Four Club Round Robin which has already begun.

Mount Washington Resort Golf Club, 210 Mount Washington Hotel Rd. Bretton Woods, (603) 278-4653: Both the Mount Washington Course (18 holes, par 72, 7004 yards) and the Mount Pleasant Course (9 holes, par 35, 3,215 yards) are open and in full swing. Vince Runyon, director of golf for the Omni Mount Washington, hosted the 2017 State Amateur Qualifier in June.

19th Hole

In 1738, the first recorded Women's Match was held at the Bruntsfield Links course in Edinburgh, Scotland. The winner was identified as "Charming Sally," who played against another whose name was not recorded. It was mentioned that caddying for both women were their husbands. You can be sure the women playing in this week's U.S. Open in New Jersey will be remembered for their skills on the course and not their personalities. But there had to be a beginning.

Joe Soraghan may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Joe Soraghan: Mid-season ramblings

“Sometimes things work out on the golf course, and sometimes they don’t. Life will go on. You try to understand what happens, but maybe today I don’t want to know. I just screwed up, so maybe I should put it behind me.” — Greg Norman, pro golfer

With our golf season hitting the halfway mark, which is usually Open weekend, a few items need to be addressed. The 2017 season has produced two first-time major winners in Masters champion Sergio Garcia and U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka. I’m not sure anyone could have handicapped those two players winning majors for the first time. The “name” players: McIlroy, Johnson, Speith and Fowler have played well but have not made it to the winner’s circle. No single player has dominated and become the clear-cut favorite the way we saw Tiger Woods dissect his competition. Golf needs a player to wear a crown, a target for which other players take aim. Competitive rivalries and competitive matches will only help create a level of interest golf has not enjoyed since Tiger’s dominance.

The USGA and the R&A are the two ruling bodies of golf. Their plans for rule changes have been an agreed-upon work in progress. There will be changes in how a player takes a drop. Around the green a player will not be penalized if a ball hits the pin while on the green. Spike marks will be allowed to be repaired, and players will be allowed to take a drop from a hazard. The time for looking for a lost ball will be reduced to three minutes instead of the five minutes now allowed.

I have reservations about some of these proposed rule changes, but I’m even more concerned about how our two ruling bodies interpret the existing rules. LPGA Pro Lexi Thompson was assessed a four-stroke penalty during a recent major. Two strokes were for improperly marking her ball on the green and two more, the next day, for signing an incorrect scorecard. Two weeks ago, PGA Pro John Rahm incorrectly remarked his ball on his sixth hole. It was a very similar scenario to what Thompson had done a month prior.

When it was brought to his attention, the indiscretion was allowed to pass. Thompson lost her tournament by one stroke. Rahm won his. The same error was made by each player, but the punishment was not consistent. Whether you agree or not with the proposed changes, the two bodies that determine how the game is to be played need to be on the same page. Clearly, there was conflict in the Thompson and Rahm rulings. If the two ruling bodies can’t be consistent and have a mutual understanding, how do they expect the amateur player to follow the rules?

After reading the latest mandate from the LPGA, I felt the guiding forces of that organization would make great school administrators, teachers or school board members. The LPGA is enforcing a dress code on the women who play on this professional tour. The key being the word “professional.”

The women who play at the highest level are not high school or middle-school children. They are making a living playing golf. The players are rewarded for their level of skill by having the opportunity to reap the benefit of clothing endorsements. Unlike their male colleagues, the women don’t use their clothing as billboards to endorse products. Style and comfort are on display every time the women tee it up. For the LPGA to say that plunging necklines, short skirts, skorts or shorts will not be tolerated will remind these ladies of their school days. The LPGA goes on to dictate what players can wear during Pro/Am events and the socials that follow. Yes, these ladies are professionals and they should dress accordingly. But the need for outlining an accepted dress code and a monetary penalty ($1,000 for the first offense) is not how professionals are treated. I went back and watched some of the women play. I didn’t find anything that seemed inappropriate or offensive.

Club Notes

North Conway Country Club, 50 Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-9391: The July Champs of the Month have been crowned. Congratulations to Donna O’Connor and Ray Belding on their fine rounds. Aug. 6, the pro/member is scheduled. This is always a fun event for members who team up with a professional in a two best-ball match. Sign up with the pro shop. This weekend, the men’s and women’s two-day member/guest will be played with a new format. Nine hole matches will be played; 27 holes on Saturday and 18 on Sunday. Points will be awarded after each match, with the member and guest playing a different pairing for each of the nine holes. Often heard at golf clubs are players talking about how few young players there are on the course. Well, two young players are already making some noise at NCCC. Ben Daugherty qualified for the Drive, Pitch and Putt competition at Windham CC and won his age division. He will take his game to the Renaissance CC where the winner will advance to Winged Foot. Congratulations also to 12-year-old Ethan Methot, who scored a hole-in-one on the par 3, 15th hole.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The 2017 member/guest was held last weekend. Taking first gross for the men was the team of Virgil Webb and Bill McBroom. First net for the men was Clark Mitchell and David Foulds. On the ladies’ side it was Cricket Catalucci and Pat Tondreau taking first gross. First net went to Lois Gardner and Carol Figurido. Week 5 of Red Fox saw the Hale Merry’s take the top spot. They were followed by Shanks-A-Lot in second and Murphy’s Law in third. The Tuesday Ladies’ League saw Jeanne Mason take first in this team event. Second went to Sandi Poor and Jenny Simone. Third went to Kathy McIntosh and Maryann Lowry. The mixed team championship is scheduled for July 30. Commonly referred to by the WGC membership as the “Divorce Open,” this annual match is a great time for all. Sign up in the pro shop.

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: The Eagle had a member scramble this week. Winning the event was the team of Terry Fitzgerald, Adam Mosston, Nicki Lynn and Joan Doucette. In second place was Rich Kardell, Brian Murphy, Hidalgo Kardell and Margo Kelly. Closest to the pin honors went to Susan Joyce. In Thursday Eagle League action, the team of Steve Piotrow, Caleb Chapman, and Joan and Paul Docette took home first place honors. Steve Piotrow also got closest to the pin honors. Eagle Mountain Pro Bob McGraw, will be offering a full swing clinic covering the fundamentals needed to be successful when hitting irons and hybrids. The cost is $20 and the class is limited to six students. July is “Family Golf Month” at the Eagle. Discounted rates are being offered every day after 2 p.m., when adults play with a junior. The cost is $15 for the adult and $10 for the junior when they play together.

Hale’s Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: Week 7 of men’s league saw Dave Pierce and John Callahan post a +5 in the weekly quota game. Ray Luchetti got closest to the pin honors. In the women’s league, it was Linda Kearney posting a +5 while Cheryl McMahon got closest to the pin. Nine, Wine and Dine continues every Sunday. For $55 per person, you get 9 holes of golf with a cart, a full dinner and a glass of wine. Call the hotel to make your reservation (356-7100) and the pro shop for a tee time. The pro shop is offering 25 percent off of all Titleist and Callaway golf bags. The shop is now carrying Srixon golf balls and Cleveland wedges and putters.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (603) 925-2462: The home team came out on top in the Four Club Round Robin played at LKCC with a score of 600.5. Following the home group was the team from Province Lake at 534, Ridgewood at 524.5 and Indian Mound at 501. The next match will be played at Province Lake on July 31. Junior golf is in its second week and so far has been very successful. Many of the kids who went through this program have returned as instructors and have been instrumental in helping ensure the future of golf in the area. If you want to see LKCC from a different perspective, check out their website, which includes a beautiful fly over video.

19th Hole

When Willie Park won the Open in 1887 and 1889, he carried with him 10 clubs. A bulger-driver, straight-faced driver, spoon, brassie, cleek, iron, mashie, iron-niblick, wooden putter and Parks Patent Putter. One putter was straight-faced for use near the hole, the other was more lofted to run putts from off the putting surface. Wouldn’t it be fun to watch the best players of today use those clubs?

Enjoy the Open and your own golf game this weekend.

Joe Soraghan may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Joe Soraghan: Good partners, bad partners

"One of the joys of playing golf is that you will meet a lot of different people. One of the inconveniences of playing golf is that you will meet different people." Anonymous

The pairings have been made and the balls thrown up to determine partners. You are with a guy known to be a tough competitor, and you're pleased. After playing the first hole, your partner is having a tough start. While walking to your second shot, you hear, "Ahhh, I don't have it today." That's not what you want to hear from your partner. Golf is a game where you are responsible for the outcome of shots and ultimately your round. But so much of the four hours spent on the course rests on those with whom you play. I find that the successful player is the one who can put aside distractions such as noise, slow play or an annoying partner that would throw him off his game. Successful players can put "blinkers on" and not allow the quirks of others to affect their game.

So what is it that makes a good or bad partner? The obvious "good pairing" is someone with whom you are comfortable; allows you to play your game; someone who offers mild encouragement but doesn't coach or roll his eyes when you miss a putt or hit a wayward shot. He stays out of your way. Golfing etiquette is being observed; players are picking up the pin when they are the first to complete a hole; divots are replaced, ball-marks on the green repaired; distractions are kept to a minimum. The personalities within the group provide everyone the opportunity not just to play well but, more important, to enjoy the round.

This can go in another direction when you play in a group that doesn't mesh. Slow play would be my No. 1 pet peeve. There are a number of contributors that will slow down a round and all of them can take a player out of his game. A player riding in a cart should make some effort to move to his ball and be ready to hit the next shot. Don't wait to be driven to the ball and then contemplate what the next move will be. Electronic range finders have been a great help to players. But when you are standing at the 100-yard marker or are 40 feet from the green, that's your yardage. Hit the required shot!

When you arrive at the green, you should be looking at the putt you will be making. Don't wait until it's your turn and and start looking at the green as if you are trying to win the Masters. You should have a sense, when you get to the ball, what your putt is going to do. After you hit the putt and leave it 6 inches from the cup, putt it out! Marking the ball and replacing it can drive others batty. If the group behind is waiting on every shot, guess what, you're slow. The mindset that I'll play my round in four hours is incorrect. You should at least keep up with the group ahead. To say, "We're going at a good pace" is inconsiderate and selfish. Slow play can contribute to a bad partnership on the course, even if that player is your best friend.

Other habits can have a player quietly begging for a round to end. People don't need to hear about a shot you made yesterday, a week ago or a year ago. They don't care. Loud outbursts and club throwing will leave you playing in a twosome, you and someone else who can't get a game. The good partner is respectful of others in the group. The key here is there are others in your foursome. It's not all about you. Finally, if you are paired with someone whose golfing habits or etiquette is not what you consider enjoyable, try to get through your round by concentrating on what you need to do on the course. Arnold Palmer once said, "When you play a round with someone, you can tell just about everything you want to know about him." Pick your partners well.

Club Notes

North Conway Country Club, 50 Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-9391: Congratulations to June Champ of the Month winners Gay Folland and Dan Kelleher. Week 4 of the Monday Ledgeview League saw It's in Da Hole take the top spot, followed by the Divot Divas and GUI. Closest to the pin went to Fran Rancourt and Bob Bechtold. The Two Day Member/Guest is scheduled for July 22-23. Sign up in the Pro Shop. Thursday Ladies League had a blind draw format. Taking first were Lilian Tringe and Tici Lutgen. It's not too late to sign up for the Junior Program, which started Thursday. This is for Juniors age 6-16.

Indian Mound Golf Course, Center Ossipee, (603) 539-7733: Nine and Dine saw the team of Ken Jones, Dave Meserve and Diane Robinson post a +2 to take top honors. In the Rivers Edge Quota game, Randy Popp posted a +7 to take top spot. Closest to the pin were Jesse Hall and Dan Ratliff. The Member/Guest is scheduled for Aug. 4. There will be three divisions: Men, Ladies and Mixed. Sign up in the Pro Shop. Inter-Club action will be played at Lake Kezar on July 17. This is a 9 a.m. shotgun start. The On The Links Travel Group will play at the Waumbek GC on July 12. Call for tee times. Three weeks of Junior Golf begins July 12. The cost is $36 for the three-week session.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The 2017 Spring 4-Ball is in the archives. Taking 1st gross for the Ladies were Cricket Catalucci and Mary Ann Lowry. Second gross went to Lynn Walker and Fran Baker. First net went to Sheila Hastings and Deb Chase. Second net winners were Louann Cellana and Lois Gardner. On the men's side, it was Ram Harvey and Steve Puzas taking 1st gross. Second gross went to Dan Willig and Glenn Mitchell. First net winners were Ron Pomerleau and Roger LeBlanc. Taking second net were Virgil Webb and Gerry Carrier. The Member/Guest is scheduled for July 15. The Hospital Tournament will be played July 20. Congratulations to Ray Devereaux for his hole in one on No. 5!

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: With close to 100 players competing in the Spring Don Ho League, the eight-week competition is coming to a close with a few teams still having to make up a week. Currently, The Sea Dogs sit atop the league at -46. The Beava Pelts, -42, and the New team have completed the season at -41. Individual winners include Tyler Whittaker, who got closest to the pin honors. Long drive winners were Matt Burkett, Fred Fallen, Lauren Hawkins and Melinda Fallen. The Fall Don Ho will begin at the end of August. In Tuesday Mixed League, it was the team of Bill Regan, Don Hall, Kathy Murphy and Joan Doucette taking first place. The Thursday Eagle League was won by the team of Caleb Chapman, Jim Doig, Terry Fitzgerald and Dan Andrews. Closest to the pin went to Nicki Lynn. July is "Family Golf Month" at the Eagle. Discounted rates are offered every day after 2 p.m., when adults play with juniors. The cost is $15 adult, $10 junior when they play together. PGA Pro Bob McGraw will offer free clinics the next two Sunday afternoons at 1 p.m.. Clubs will be provided if needed. Bob is offering a full swing clinic Saturday, July 9. The cost is $20, and it is limited to six students.

Hale's Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: "There's always time for 9." Hale's and the White Mountain Hotel continue to offer Nine, Wine, and Dine every Sunday. For $55 per person, you get nine holes of golf with a cart as well as a dinner and a glass of wine. Call the hotel to make a reservation (603-356-7100) and the Pro Shop to make a tee time. Week 5 of Men's League saw Doug Beauregard and Bill Earle post a +5 in the quota game. Closest to the pin winner was Frank Filosa. The women had the week off as league play fell on the holiday. Both leagues will play next week.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: The Scotch Double was played June 28. Taking first was Trapani's. They were followed by Stone and Mueller's. The Tuesday Social League saw the team of Dick Trapani, Bill Mende, Curtis Lansing and Jerry Guyot take first. Second place went to Gene LeBlanc, Bob Bean, Bill Wapenski and Larry Farnhum. The Member/Guest will be held Sunday, July 16. Call the clubhouse to register. Deadline for the Club Championship event will be July 16. Junior golf will begin July 11. With last weekend's storm providing wind and rain, some members at LKCC were disappointed the "tree on No. 2" survived.

Mount Washington Resort Golf Club, 210 Mount Washington Hotel Rd, Bretton Woods, (603) 278-4653: Both The Mount Washington Course (18 holes, par 72, 7,004 yards) and The Mount Pleasant Course (9 holes, par 35, 3,215 yards) are both open and in full swing. Vince Runyon, director of golf for the Omni Mount Washington, hosted the State Amateur Qualifier on June 27.

19th Hole

Ted Ray, winner of the 1912 Open and the 1920 U.S. Open, was renowned for the distance he hit a golf ball. A member of his club kept asking him to share his secret to his length off the tee. Finally, having enough of the member, he turned to him and said, "Hit it a bloody sight harder, there is no secret." Enjoy your golf this weekend and hit it harder. Maybe you'll be rewarded with great results.

Joe Soraghan may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">.